Paragliding safety kit

This kit weighs in at just 350 grams and lives in my harness. I feel this is a necessary item and is particularly useful for overseas trips and adventure flying. Modify this and come up with your own concoction for flying cross country at home, on international trips, for competitions or soaring your local coastal site. Consider keeping a more comprehensive medical kit in your car, you never know, you may save a life. What do I plan (not) to do with these items? A more detailed description can be found below this list. Read further for some first aid basics. Send me a message if you feel I have missed any important items.

  • Analgesia (5 X Oxycodone 5mg, 5 X Targin 10mg/5mg, 10 X Diclofenac 50mg, 10 X 500mg Paracetamol)
  • Space blanket
  • Superglue
  • Wound closure strips
  • Self Adhesive Plastic Strips
  • Bandage
  • Combine dressing
  • Syringefirst_aid_kit_2_mod
  • Normal saline 10ml (0.9% sodium chloride)
  • Sterile gloves
  • Betadine – antiseptic liquid (15ml)
  • Alcohol wipes (x4)
  • Cotton balls
  • Tweezers
  • Scissors
  • Dental floss
  • Oral Rehydration Solution – gastrolyte sachets
  • Ripstop repair
  • Spare lines
  • Twine
  • Film canister with lint, 10 matches and a small piece of flint (in a waterproof ziplock bag)
  • Tenacious tape
  • Bungee cord
  • Rubber bands
  • Pen and a piece of paper

A more detailed description

Medication for pain

  • Analgesia (fancy word for pain medication)

I fly with 5 Oxycodone 5mg, 5 Targin 10mg/5mg, 10 Diclofenac 50mg (you can use ibuprofen instead – I have an allergy to this) and a sleeve of Paracetamol 500mg. Oxycodone is a fast acting synthetic opioid. Targin (Oxycodone and Naloxone) is a longer lasting (12 hour) concoction. A doctor’s prescription is required because they are tightly controlled (schedule 8 in Australia) due to misuse within the community and are considered drugs of addiction. They are near-on-impossible to obtain for a ‘what if’ scenario, like a paragliding crash. If you manage to source some (mine were left over from an accident) be sure to keep the original package which includes the details of the medicine (your name, doctors name, drug, dose and frequency). Also be sure to check the countries’ restrictions when travelling internationally. Diclofenac (Voltarin in Aus) is an anti-inflammatory and can be bought over the counter. Paracetamol (or acetaminophen in the US) is used for minor pain relief and works very well in combination with the other medication. Check for allergies if administering them.

Hypothermia

  • Space blanket

Low weight, low bulk reflective blanket used to reflect heat back to the body. It also reflects light and can be used as a shelter or a rescue beacon.

first_aid_6_mod

Wound Closure

  • Superglue

Use superglue to close minor wounds (max 5cm) with minimal bleeding. Ensure you clean the wound first with sterile water, betadine or alcohol wipes. Veterinary glue is the best as it is cheaper than hospital grade and does the same job.

  • Wound closure strips

As the title suggests they can be used to close wounds. Once again make sure you clean the wound first if possible.

  • Self adhesive plastic strips

For minor cuts, scrapes and punctures.

  • Bandage

Used  with the combine dressing once the bleeding has slowed/stopped. Bandages can also be used to splint broken bones, pressurise snake bites and to reduce swelling for muscle strains etc.

  • Combine dressing

Highly absorbent, soft, non woven fabric used under the bandage once the bleeding has slowed/stopped.

Wound and skin cleansing

  • Syringe

Fill the syringe with normal saline to flush out wounds.

  • Normal saline 10ml (0.9% sodium chloride)

Use with the syringe to flush out wounds.first_aid_another_mod

  • Sterile gloves

Added barrier against infection. Use if you expect to come in contact with bodily fluids.

  • Betadine – antiseptic liquid (15ml)

Use to treat common skin infections (minor burns, cuts and infections).

  • Alcohol wipes (x4)

Use for sterilising/cleaning skin. Super small and light.

  • Cotton balls

Use with the betadine to clean common skin infections (minor burns, cuts and infections).

  • Tweezers

Use for removing debris from skin and wounds. Sterilise the tweezers with the alcohol wipes or betadine.

  • Sissors

Use to cut the gauze and bandage.

Dehydration

  • Oral rehydration solution – gastrolyte sachets

Electrolyte solution to mix with water if you are dehydrated. Useful if you have and upset stomach or a long walk home.

Other miscellaneous items

  • Dental floss
Screen Shot 2018-12-20 at 8.23.38 am.png
Spare Lines, ripstop sticky repair patches, bungee cord.

Not just to clean between your teeth. Stuck in a tree? Lower it down if you need to pull up rescue rope.

  • Ripstop repair patches

Repair rips in your wing.

  • Spare lines

Fix or replace broken lines.

  • Twine

Tie stuff together.

  • Film canister with lint, 10 matches and a small piece of flint (in a waterproof ziplock bag)

Light a fire. Lint from a clothes dryer makes an amazing fire starter (thanks Gavin McClurg for this suggestion).

  • Tenacious tape

Strong repair adhesive which can be used for a variety of uses (similar to duck tape but is lighter and leaves no residue).

  • Bungee cord

Useful for fixing various things.

  • Rubber Bands

They are just dam handy.

  • Pen and a piece of paper

For writing down vital signs. Write down time, pulse rate, breath rate, neurological status and anything else you fell appropriate. Useful information when communicating with emergency services.


First Aid Refresher

dangerLets start with some ABCs, well it is now DRS-ABCD but the same principle applies. At a minimum check the pilot’s Airways, Breathing and Circulation. Record observations when possible with your phone or pen and paper.

Please check out this link for more comprehensive information on First Aid Basics and DRSABCD.

DANGER – Check for danger. Don’t put yourself in danger. Remove/rectify the danger then carry on to the next step.

RESPONSE – Are they conscious? Do they respond to questions, touch or pain (pinch their shoulder)?

SEND FOR HELP – Call on the radio, phone or press the emergency button on the satellite device. Call emergency services.

AIRWAY – Is their airway clear? Are they breathing? Clear their airway if obstructed.response

BREATHING – Look for chest movements (moving up and down). Put your ear to their mouth and listen. Turn them onto their side (be sure to protect their head, neck and spine) and wait for emergency services.

CPR/Circulation – Unconscious and not breathing? Put them on their back and start CPR.

If the pilot is bleeding profusely don’t delay. Apply pressure to the wound to stop the bleeding. Apply a dressing (combine) and bandage when it has slowed then call emergency services.


Please contact me if you feel I have missed anything or if you feel any information is incorrect.

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